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Aquatic habitat, function, and ecosystem services
Explore more in Water:

Periods of water scarcity have impacts on aquatic habitat, function, and ecosystem services.

Aquatic habitat, function, and ecosystem services

Periods of water scarcity have impacts on aquatic habitat, function, and ecosystem services.

Periods of water scarcity have impacts on aquatic habitat, function, and ecosystem services. Increasingly, historically perennial aquatic systems are becoming intermittent, ceasing to flow or drying completely for extended periods during the year. Our approach to understanding the implications of water scarcity uses multiple approaches to understand how change is occurring. We fill in gaps of this existing data using detailed field studies. We have surveyed and instrumented stream reaches and isolated wetlands to examine responses of macroinvertebrates, freshwater mollusks, fishes, amphibians, reptiles, and higher vertebrates, to hydrologic change.

Explore more in Water:

Increasingly, historically perennial aquatic systems are becoming intermittent, ceasing to flow or drying completely for extended periods during the year. Our approach to understanding the implications of water scarcity uses multiple approaches to understand how change is occurring.

We fill in gaps of this existing data using detailed field studies.

We have surveyed and instrumented stream reaches and isolated wetlands to examine responses of macroinvertebrates, freshwater mollusks, fishes, amphibians, reptiles, and higher vertebrates, to hydrologic change.

Increasingly, historically perennial aquatic systems are becoming intermittent, ceasing to flow or drying completely for extended periods during the year. Our approach to understanding the implications of water scarcity uses multiple approaches to understand how change is occurring.

We fill in gaps of this existing data using detailed field studies.

We have surveyed and instrumented stream reaches and isolated wetlands to examine responses of macroinvertebrates, freshwater mollusks, fishes, amphibians, reptiles, and higher vertebrates, to hydrologic change.

Emerging out of this complexity are functions and process,such as carbon sequestration and water regulation whict benefit people.

These tangible benefits, often termed ecosystem services,

give forests measurable value to people aside from the economic value of the timber.

This research theme centers on understanding and quantifying these values as they relate to longleaf pine woodlands, and identifying vulnerabilities of these ecosystems to climate variations, disturbances, and changes in management.

This theme builds on several interconnected long-term data sets at the Center, including measurements of

forest productivity and biodiversity
forest water use
research on carbon cycling

Numerous other studies have examined diverse topics ranging from tree defenses against bark beetle attack to the effects of nitrogen fertilization on plant diversity. Studies in this theme currently focus on the effects of fire suppression on forest resilience and ecosystem services, and the effects of Hurricane Michael on ecosystem function.

Emerging out of this complexity are functions and process,such as carbon sequestration and water regulation whict benefit people.

These tangible benefits, often termed ecosystem services,

give forests measurable value to people aside from the economic value of the timber.

This research theme centers on understanding and quantifying these values as they relate to longleaf pine woodlands, and identifying vulnerabilities of these ecosystems to climate variations, disturbances, and changes in management.

This theme builds on several interconnected long-term data sets at the Center, including measurements of

forest productivity and biodiversity
forest water use
research on carbon cycling

Numerous other studies have examined diverse topics ranging from tree defenses against bark beetle attack to the effects of nitrogen fertilization on plant diversity. Studies in this theme currently focus on the effects of fire suppression on forest resilience and ecosystem services, and the effects of Hurricane Michael on ecosystem function.

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Key Publications

AtkinsonCL., SPOpsahl, A. P. Covich, SWGolladay, and LMConner. 2010. Stable isotope signatures, tissue stoichiometry, and nutrient cycling (C and N) of native and invasive freshwater bivalves. Journal of the North American Benthological Society 29:496-505.

DuBose, T. P., C. L. Atkinson, C. C. Vaughn, S. W. Golladay. 2019. Drought-induced, punctuated loss of freshwater mussels alters ecosystem function across temporal scales. Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution 7:1-13 DOI: https://doi.org/10.3389/fevo.2019.00274

GolladaySW., PGagnonMKearnsJMBattle, and DWHicks. 2004. Response of freshwater mussel assemblages (Bivalvia: Unionidae) to a record drought in the Gulf Coastal Plain of southwestern Georgia. Journal of the North American Benthological Society 23:494-506.

LinerAE., LLSmithSWGolladay, S. B. Castleberry, and J. W. Gibbons. 2008. Amphibian distributions within three types of isolated wetlands in southwest Georgia. American Midland Naturalist 160:69-81. pdf

MuenzTK., SWGolladay, G. Vellidis, and LLSmith. 2006. Stream buffer effectiveness in an agriculturally influenced area, southwestern Georgia: responses of water quality, macroinvertebrates, and amphibians. Journal of Environmental Quality 35:1924-1938.

Shivers, S. D., S. W. Golladay, M. N. Waters, S. B. Wilde, P. D. Ashford, and A. P. Covich. 2018. Changes in submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) coverage caused by extended drought and flood pulses. Lake and Reservoir Management 34:218-229. free eprint

C. N. Jones, N. G. Nelson, and Smith, L. L. 2019. Featured Collection Introduction: The emerging science of Aquatic System Connectivity II. Journal of the American Water Resources Association 55:1-3 DOI: 10.1111/1752-1688.12760

SterrettSC., LLSmithSWGolladay, S. H. Schweitzer, and J. C. Maerz. 2011. The conservation implications of riparian land use on river turtles. Animal Conservation 14:38-46.

AtkinsonCL., SPOpsahl, A. P. Covich, SWGolladay, and LMConner. 2010. Stable isotope signatures, tissue stoichiometry, and nutrient cycling (C and N) of native and invasive freshwater bivalves. Journal of the North American Benthological Society 29:496-505.

DuBose, T. P., C. L. Atkinson, C. C. Vaughn, S. W. Golladay. 2019. Drought-induced, punctuated loss of freshwater mussels alters ecosystem function across temporal scales. Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution 7:1-13 DOI: https://doi.org/10.3389/fevo.2019.00274

GolladaySW., PGagnonMKearnsJM
Battle, and DWHicks. 2004. Response of freshwater mussel assemblages (Bivalvia: Unionidae) to a record drought in the Gulf Coastal Plain of southwestern Georgia. Journal of the North American Benthological Society 23:494-506.

LinerAE., LLSmithSWGolladay, S. B. Castleberry, and J. W. Gibbons. 2008. Amphibian distributions within three types of isolated wetlands in southwest Georgia. American Midland Naturalist 160:69-81. pdf

MuenzTK., SWGolladay, G. Vellidis, and LLSmith. 2006. Stream buffer effectiveness in an agriculturally influenced area, southwestern Georgia: responses of water quality, macroinvertebrates, and amphibians. Journal of Environmental Quality 35:1924-1938.

Shivers, S. D., S. W. Golladay, M. N. Waters, S. B. Wilde, P. D. Ashford, and A. P. Covich. 2018. Changes in submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) coverage caused by extended drought and flood pulses. Lake and Reservoir Management 34:218-229. free eprint

C. N. Jones, N. G. Nelson, and Smith, L. L. 2019. Featured Collection Introduction: The emerging science of Aquatic System Connectivity II. Journal of the American Water Resources Association 55:1-3 DOI: 10.1111/1752-1688.12760

SterrettSC., LLSmithSWGolladay, S. H. Schweitzer, and J. C. Maerz. 2011. The conservation implications of riparian land use on river turtles. Animal Conservation 14:38-46.

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