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Woods
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Longleaf pine ecosystems

were once one of the most extensive forest types in North America, encompassing over 92 million acres of the Southeast. Reduced to less than 5% of their historic extent, longleaf pine and its associated wildlife communities are now a priority for conservation and restoration across the region.  In addition to habitat for both game and nongame wildlife, longleaf pine forests provide a range of other values such as biological diversity, high-quality timber products, societal goods and services (e.g., water yield and carbon storage), recreational opportunities, and aesthetic values.

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Ichauway – with almost 18000 acres of century-old longleaf pine forests, a large portion of which harbors undisturbed native groundcover – provides an unparalleled opportunity to better understand these important ecosystems. Since the founding of the Jones Center the ecology, management, and restoration of longleaf pine have been a central focus of our programs.

  • Topic Ipsum Dolor
  • Topic Ipsum Dolor
  • Topic Ipsum Dolor
  • Topic Ipsum Dolor
  • Topic Ipsum Dolor
STAT
Reduced to less than 5%

of their historic extent, the rarity of longleaf pine ecosystems makes them a research priority

Burning_Snag_a
STAT
Reduced to
less than 5%

of their historic extent, the rarity of longleaf pine ecosystems makes them a research priority

In addition to values that include aesthetics, biodiversity, and wildlife habitat, longleaf woodlands provide important societal goods as services, such as the maintenance of water quantity and quality.

Longleaf pine ecosystems and their associated wetlands are renowned for their biological diversity. We have documented approximately 1100 species of vascular plants on Ichauway, almost a third of all the plants found in Georgia.

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